Partnership with Gray’s Inn provides once-in-a-lifetime experiences

BrookeEaves-RashardPendarvis

For over a decade now, USC Law has continuously grown and strengthened its relationship with the Honourable Society of Gray’s Inn, one of England’s four Inns of Court. But how does this partnership help students prepare for their careers? Class of 2014 alumna Brooke Eaves reflects on the lessons she learned from her participation in the Moot Court competition against Gray’s Inn, hosted here at USC Law last fall:

“Spending time with the Moot Court Team from Gray’s Inn during the week of September 11, 2013, was an amazing learning experience. During their stay in Columbia, SC, I had the opportunity to take the Gray’s Inn Team out to lunch and dinner along with other USC Moot Court Members. Throughout our meals together we discussed the legal system in London and the Gray’s Inn team members were particularly intrigued by the “Po’ Boy” sandwich.

My partner, Rashad Pendarvis, and I argued against Jamie Scott and Amy Stout from the Gray’s Inn team in the Moot Court Competition at the USC School of Law. Our competition problem was based on English law, which gave me the opportunity to learn about their laws and legal system. Specifically, my legal arguments were largely based on the Human Rights Act which is the United Kingdom’s equivalent to the United States Constitution.

During this competition, we presented our case before Associate Justice Costa M. Pleicones of the South Carolina Supreme Court, Chief Judge John C. Few of the South Carolina Court of Appeals, and The Honourable Justice Dame Davies of the High Court in London.

BrookeEaves-2The opportunity to argue before these Honourable Judges as a law student was truly a once in a lifetime experience that tremendously improved my oral argument skills. Moreover, the judges gave us invaluable feedback and tips which have greatly enhanced our abilities as oral advocates.

In addition, I was recently hired to become an Associate Attorney at the Maguire Law Firm in Myrtle Beach, SC. During my interview with the Maguire Law Firm, I was able to share my experience in the Gray’s Inn Moot Court Competition and I believe that the skills I further developed through this competition will help me to serve as an effective oral advocate for my clients at the Maguire Law Firm.

The Gray’s Inn Moot Court Competition was open to the public and all Moot Court alumni members of the USC School of Law were invited to attend. After the event, I had the pleasure of speaking with several alumni members and South Carolina Judges who found the competition to be an impressive representation of the USC School of Law’s Moot Court Team. The relationship between the USC School of Law and Gray’s Inn has been very beneficial to my legal education and I am very appreciative of the dedication that Professor McWilliams and Professor Bockman have displayed in their support of these unique educational opportunities with Gray’s Inn.”

Rising 3L receives coveted business law clerkship

AmandaReasonerWith summer upon us, law students are preparing to disperse across the state and country for a variety of externships and summer positions. Amanda Reasoner, a rising third-year student, will be among them as she heads north to Wilmington, Del., for an eight-week clerkship with the Honorable Donald F. Parsons, Jr. a Vice Chancellor for Delaware’s Court of Chancery.

Reasoner’s clerkship is a part of the ABA sponsored Business Law Diversity Clerkship Program.  “It’s an amazing honor to be selected for the Court of Chancery clerkship,” said Reasoner, who is one of only nine students nationwide chosen to participate in the program this summer. “With the clerkship I will be receiving exposure that is very rare to get while still in law school and for that I am very fortunate. I’m really looking forward to the opportunity to see how laws affecting businesses and commercial affairs are decided on a day-to-day basis in the courts.”

This judicial clerkship is a mark of distinction, as well as an opportunity for the legal community to encourage law students from a variety of backgrounds to participate in and consider business law professionally. “The most important thing I can do is go to work and do the job to the best of my abilities,” said Reasoner. “The more people see strong capable women and underrepresented professionals excelling in business law, the more accessible the field will become, attracting talented individuals from a range of experiences.”

Eighteen holes to help heal soldiers’ Hidden Wounds

How can a round of golf help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder?

Start with a group of committed law students who are driven to serve those who have served our country.

For the third straight year, two University of South Carolina School of Law student-led organizations, Service Members and Veterans in Law (SVL) and the Student Bar Association (SBA), joined forces to host a charity golf tournament with the goal of raising money and awareness for the Columbia, S.C.-based non-profit, Hidden Wounds.

John Wall, a rising third-year student, president of SVL, and a veteran who has been deployed five times to Iraq and Afghanistan, explained some of the history behind the tournament, saying, “The SBA has traditionally put on an annual, charitable golf tournament, and some SVL members approached the SBA leadership a few years ago to see if we could co-sponsor the event and help an organization that supports veterans.”

Hidden Wounds’ mission is to provide peace of mind and comfort for military personnel suffering combat stress injuries such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other psychological post-war challenges by providing interim and emergency psychological treatment for veterans, military personnel, and their families.

“It’s a tragic fact that in 2013 alone, suicides killed more of our nation’s veterans and service members than were killed during 10 year of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan,” said Wall. “Hidden Wounds’ work goes a long way to preventing suicides and helping veterans cope with PTSD- and TBI-related issues. That’s one of the reasons we were excited to support them.”

In 2014, the tournament more than doubled the amount of money raised in previous years, donating $2800, which will provide much-needed counseling services to area-veterans suffering from combat-related stress injuries. Wall hopes for better results in 2015.

“This year, a lot of individuals were instrumental to the tournament’s success, but [rising 3L] Anthony Kim was the main driving force behind it, for which he deserves a lot of credit. I’m looking forward to working with him again to make next year’s tournament even bigger,” he said.

The annual event is just one of the ways that SVL helps South Carolina veterans. In 2013, the group brought the national initiative “Project Salute” to the state for the first time, and worked with local attorneys to help veterans file or appeal their benefits claims.

Additionally, SVL members help other military-turned-law-students make the transition into law school, and work to create networking opportunities with veterans in the legal community, such as career advice and resume workshops.


 

Pictured above left to right: Members of SVL Michael Bradbury (2015), Ryan Templeton (2014) and John Wall (2015) present a check to Hidden Wounds board members Freddie Brock, US Army (Ret.) and Steven Diaz, USMC (Ret.). Also pictured is Ashley Canara, a senior public relations student at USC and a volunteer with Hidden Wounds.

Two ABA presidents to weigh in on future of legal education at South Carolina Law Review Symposium

2014SCLRSymposium-EmailGraphicWill non-lawyers soon be allowed to provide certain legal services? They might if one of the key conclusions from a recent report by the ABA Task Force on the Future of Legal Education is implemented.

The report, released in January, will be the focus of the South Carolina Law Review Symposium Feb. 27 – 28 at the University of South Carolina School of Law. The symposium will explore why law schools and the legal profession must make changes – and what those changes should be – to keep up with the evolving marketplace for legal education and legal services delivery.

Titled “On Task? Expanding the Boundaries of Legal Education,” the symposium will take place in the law school’s auditorium.

The symposium will begin at 4 p.m. Thursday with a panel discussion in response to the Task Force’s report and a keynote address by Jim Silkenat, president of the American Bar Association and partner at Sullivan & Worcester LLP in New York. Silkenat will discuss the legal profession and future of legaleducation and its impact on law schools, corporate counsel and private attorneys. USC board of trustee, alumnus and ABA president-elect William Hubbard will introduce Silkenat and offer his views on the future of legal education.

Thursday’s keynote address is free and open to the public and all symposium events are free to USC students and faculty.  Advanced registration online is required.

Friday’s sessions, which take place 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. will focus on proposals outlined in the Task Force’s recent report and law schools’ responses to changing markets within—and outside of—the law curriculum. Panels also will address the changing expectations of law firms and clients, new platforms in the delivery of legal services, the growing demand for information management by corporate clients, and the promises and challenges of limited licensing.

The symposium will feature an impressive array of panelists and speakers, including the chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court and the ABA’s managing director of accreditation and legal education.

Participants include:

  • Elizabeth Chambliss, USC professor of law and director of the Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough Center on Professionalism
  • Steve Crossland, chairman of the Washington Supreme Court Limited License Legal Technician Board
  • Barry Currier, managing director of accreditation and legal education, ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar
  • Richard Granat, co-director and faculty member at Florida Coastal School of Law’s Center for Law Practice Technology
  • Neil Hamilton, professor of law and director of the University of St. Thomas School of Law’s Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions
  • Renee Knake, professor of law and co-director of Michigan State University College of Law’s Kelly Institute of Ethics and the Legal Profession
  • Stephanie Kimbro, director of the Center of Law Practice Technology, founder of Curo Legal, and attorney at Burton Law, LLC
  • Paula Littlewood, executive director of the Washington State Bar Association
  • Hon. Barbara Madsen, chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court
  • John Martin, partner and practice leader of Nelson Mullins Encompass at Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP
  • Erica Moeser, president of the National Conference of Bar Examiners
  • Lisa Rohrer, executive director of executive education and the Case Development Initiative at Harvard Law School
  • Rebecca Sandefur, Assoc. Professor of Sociology and Law & Director of Graduate Studies in Sociology, University of Illinois and Faculty Fellow, American Bar Foundation
  • Ronald Staudt, professor of law and director of Chicago-Kent College of Law’s Center for Access to Justice and Technology
  • David Yellen, dean and professor of Law at Loyola University Chicago’s School of Law

The symposium is approved by the S.C. Bar for 9.25 CLE credits, including 3.25 hours of ethics credit. The fee for practitioners who register by Feb. 24 is $75. Registration after Feb. 24 is $100. A discount is available for practicing government employees, USC law alumni and those not seeking CLE credit.

For more information and to register online, go to the South Carolina Law Reviewwebsite. Questions should be directed to Kara Grevey and Robert Osborne, symposium editors, at 803-777-5874 or via email at symposium@sclawreview.org.

Press contact: Peggy Binette at 803-777-7704 or peggy@mailbox.sc.edu.

Two ABA presidents to weigh in on future of legal education at South Carolina Law Review Symposium

2014SCLRSymposium-EmailGraphicWill non-lawyers soon be allowed to provide certain legal services? They might if one of the key conclusions from a recent report by the ABA Task Force on the Future of Legal Education is implemented.

The report, released in January, will be the focus of the South Carolina Law Review Symposium Feb. 27 – 28 at the University of South Carolina School of Law. The symposium will explore why law schools and the legal profession must make changes – and what those changes should be – to keep up with the evolving marketplace for legal education and legal services delivery.

Titled “On Task? Expanding the Boundaries of Legal Education,” the symposium will take place in the law school’s auditorium.

The symposium will begin at 4 p.m. Thursday with a panel discussion in response to the Task Force’s report and a keynote address by Jim Silkenat, president of the American Bar Association and partner at Sullivan & Worcester LLP in New York. Silkenat will discuss the legal profession and future of legaleducation and its impact on law schools, corporate counsel and private attorneys. USC board of trustee, alumnus and ABA president-elect William Hubbard will introduce Silkenat and offer his views on the future of legal education.

Thursday’s keynote address is free and open to the public and all symposium events are free to USC students and faculty.  Advanced registration online is required.

Friday’s sessions, which take place 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. will focus on proposals outlined in the Task Force’s recent report and law schools’ responses to changing markets within—and outside of—the law curriculum. Panels also will address the changing expectations of law firms and clients, new platforms in the delivery of legal services, the growing demand for information management by corporate clients, and the promises and challenges of limited licensing.

The symposium will feature an impressive array of panelists and speakers, including the chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court and the ABA’s managing director of accreditation and legal education.

Participants include:

  • Elizabeth Chambliss, USC professor of law and director of the Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough Center on Professionalism
  • Steve Crossland, chairman of the Washington Supreme Court Limited License Legal Technician Board
  • Barry Currier, managing director of accreditation and legal education, ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar
  • Richard Granat, co-director and faculty member at Florida Coastal School of Law’s Center for Law Practice Technology
  • Neil Hamilton, professor of law and director of the University of St. Thomas School of Law’s Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions
  • Renee Knake, professor of law and co-director of Michigan State University College of Law’s Kelly Institute of Ethics and the Legal Profession
  • Stephanie Kimbro, director of the Center of Law Practice Technology, founder of Curo Legal, and attorney at Burton Law, LLC
  • Paula Littlewood, executive director of the Washington State Bar Association
  • Hon. Barbara Madsen, chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court
  • John Martin, partner and practice leader of Nelson Mullins Encompass at Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP
  • Erica Moeser, president of the National Conference of Bar Examiners
  • Lisa Rohrer, executive director of executive education and the Case Development Initiative at Harvard Law School
  • Rebecca Sandefur, Assoc. Professor of Sociology and Law & Director of Graduate Studies in Sociology, University of Illinois and Faculty Fellow, American Bar Foundation
  • Ronald Staudt, professor of law and director of Chicago-Kent College of Law’s Center for Access to Justice and Technology
  • David Yellen, dean and professor of Law at Loyola University Chicago’s School of Law

The symposium is approved by the S.C. Bar for 9.25 CLE credits, including 3.25 hours of ethics credit. The fee for practitioners who register by Feb. 24 is $75. Registration after Feb. 24 is $100. A discount is available for practicing government employees, USC law alumni and those not seeking CLE credit.

For more information and to register online, go to the South Carolina Law Reviewwebsite. Questions should be directed to Kara Grevey and Robert Osborne, symposium editors, at 803-777-5874 or via email at symposium@sclawreview.org.

Press contact: Peggy Binette at 803-777-7704 or peggy@mailbox.sc.edu.

Law in context: A new approach to LRAW

The first class of students in the new LRAW program, enjoyed the new format.

The first class of students in the new LRAW program, enjoyed the new format.

Practice makes perfect – at least that’s part of the theory behind the ABA’s emphasis on skills training that has law schools across the country taking a closer look at how they prepare their students for the practice of law.  At The University of South Carolina School of Law, we take very seriously our mission of equipping our graduates with the skills they need to become excellent practicing lawyers.

In 2011, the Law School unveiled its new Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing Program (LRAW) designed to provide our students with the skills they will need to succeed in law school and in the practice of law. Law students arrive on their first day of law school with the research, writing, and analytical skills they developed in their undergraduate study, work, and life experiences.  Many, however, find the study of law more challenging than expected because their former methods of researching, writing, and analysis did not fully prepare them for the rigors of finding, analyzing, and writing about the law.

Legal Research, Analysis & Writing (LRAW) is a  component of the first year law school curriculum that integrates essential skills necessary for the practice of law. The LRAW program is an intensive six-credit hour program divided over the fall and spring semesters of the first year. In the fall semester (LRAW-1), students learn the basic methods of researching state statutes and case law, how to analyze those statutes and cases, identify and understand legal rules derived from those authorities, and apply those rules to make informed predictions about legal issues. Students also learn how to convey legal analysis clearly and concisely and how to draft a legal prediction in the form of a memorandum of law.

In the spring semester (LRAW-2), students build on their basic research, analytical, and writing skills to learn how to research federal statutes and cases, regulations, and secondary sources. Students also learn the skills of persuasive writing and argumentation through the preparation of an appellate brief and oral argument.

Students and LRAW faculty alike are excited about the new program, and the students are already feeling more confident about their research and writing skills.  In a 2012 Law School Survey of Student Engagement, first year students indicated that their experiences at USC School of Law positively contributed to their abilities to write clearly and effectively and to develop their legal research skills.  Students are already benefitting from the impact of the integrated program, both inside and outside the classroom.  Here are some things our students are saying about their LRAW experiences:

PENDARVIS,-MARVIN-224__124-1002-S-webI was always told I was a good writer, but it was not until I came to law school that I realized legal writing was different.  I have learned that the best legal writing is concise, uses active voice, and is fluid throughout.  My writing has become better by incorporating all three into my work. Additionally, my research skills have become better.  Because the program now puts an emphasis on the research component, I feel our class really benefited.  I was  able to employ those skills throughout the summer, and found myself going back to basic research strategies I learned in class that allowed me to find what I needed and saved on costs. My improved writing has also been noticed during my summer clerkship.  A partner commented on how impressed he was with my discussion of the information in one memo.  I drafted another memo that was good enough to be used in a summary judgment motion.  I think it is neat that I am able to write a legal memo in one or two days.  I would have never fathomed that before this class.” – Marvin Pendarvis, third-year law student at USC Law.

 

KEITH,-KARA-182__124-1002-S-webLRAW definitely helped me in my summer clerkship.  My firm only uses Westlaw, but I know how to navigate it well, thanks to the class.  I absolutely have used everything I learned,  including the Bluebook and citations.  I am very confident in how I write now, and the attorneys at my firm used my memos for their court documents.” – Kara Keith, third-year law student at USC Law.

 

 

HANCOCK,-DANIEL-226__124-1002-M-web“(In the summer of 2011), I worked at Fort Jackson with several fellow Captains who were working as Army prosecutors. I had my first opportunities to draft first a motion and a motion response for two supervisors.  Each supervisor was impressed by my work and the skills I had learned this past academic year in 1L LRAW classes.  Soon thereafter, I also perceived a shift in their attitudes toward “the intern” as a result of my success using the writing and research skills taught in LRAW, and I  began receiving more assignments to draft documents and less supervision in putting those products together before final review.” – Daniel Hancock, third-year law student at USC Law.

This story was contributed by Assistant Directors of Legal Writing Jan Baker andAmy Milligan, and Assistant Director of Legal Research Instruction Terrye Conroy.

Meet our newest faculty

The University of South Carolina School of Law is dedicated to providing its students with a cutting-edge understanding and application of the law.

We believe that a great law school begins with a great faculty, which is why we’re proud to announce that our faculty has recently grown to include 10 new members who are helping us strengthen our curriculum in key areas:

 

NEW LAW PROFS GROUP AND MUGSDerek W. Black
Professor of Law
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
JD – University of North Carolina
BA – University of Tennessee

Courses Taught:
Civil Rights Seminar
Constitutional Law
Education Law & Policy
Evidence

Previous Appointment:
Associate Professor of Law, Howard University

Scholarly Interests:
Education law, educational access issues

“I work and teach in education law because I know firsthand the central role that education plays in everyone’s life chances.  For many children, a good education is the only shot they have at the ‘American Dream.’ However, too often they must fight against the odds because the educational opportunities they receive are drastically different than the opportunities in other schools.”

NEW LAW PROFS GROUP AND MUGSMarie C. Boyd
Visiting Assistant Professor of Law
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
JD – Yale
AB – Harvard

Courses Taught:
Administrative Law
Food & Drug Law
Torts

 

Previous Appointment:
Associate, Covington & Burling LLP

Scholarly Interest:
Food and drug law

“My research focus is on food and drug law, an area that impacts so many aspects of our lives. My interest stems from my chemistry background, my prior practice as an associate in the food and drug practice group at Covington and Burling LLP, and of course, my love of food.”

Chambliss_Elizabeth-BWElizabeth Chambliss
Professor of Law
Joining in Fall 2013

Education:
JD – University of Wisconsin
PhD – University of Wisconsin
BA – College of Charleston

Previous Appointment:
Professor of Law, New York Law School

 

Scholarly Interests:
Legal profession, professional responsibility, legal education

“It’s an exciting and important time for research on the legal profession. Globalization and advances in information technology have created profound challenges — and opportunities — for the delivery of legal services that will significantly affect the careers of this generation of lawyers. The organizational settings in which lawyers practice are becoming increasingly complex; lawyers increasingly are working in multi-professional and non-legal environments; and new delivery models are testing the boundaries of traditional lawyer regulation. My goal is to bring an appreciation of these changing conditions to the study of legal ethics and law practice in a variety of settings, and to promote law schools’ collective commitment to improving the delivery of legal services.”

DRAKE, ALYSON 015__134-1014Alyson M. Drake
Reference Librarian
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
JD – William and Mary
MLS – University of Maryland
BA – Nazareth College

Courses Taught:
Legal Research, Analysis & Writing I
Legal Research, Analysis & Writing II

 

Scholarly Interest:
Curriculum development for legal research instruction

“My scholarly interests include legal research instruction curriculum development because as a law student with a Master’s in Library and Information Science, I was surprised at how little formal research instruction was given at many law schools, particularly since strong research skills are one of a lawyer’s most important tools.”

Gupta-Kagan-Josh-BWJosh Gupta-Kagan
Assistant Professor of Law
Joining in Fall 2013

Education:
JD – New York University
BA – Yale

Previous Appointment:
Lecturer in Law and Staff Attorney, Civil Justice Clinic: Children and Family Defense Project,Washington University School of Law

 

Scholarly Interest:
Legal issues affecting children and families

“I study how the law regulates children and their families, and especially how the state intervenes when children may have been abused or neglected or may have committed delinquent acts.  As a society, we owe it to children to figure out legal systems that can intervene as effectively as possible, while respecting the rights of children as individuals and as members of their families.”

HATHCOCK,-APRIL-41__134-1144-BW1April M. Hathcock
Reference Librarian
Joined in May 2013

Education:
MLS – University of South Florida
JD – Duke
LLM – Duke
BA – Agnes Scott College

Previous Appointment:
Instructional Support Specialist & Adjunct Instructor of Ethics, St. Petersburg College

Scholarly Interest:
International and comparative law

“As a former Army brat, I have always been fascinated by the rules and customs that make up the cornerstone of international relations. My interest in international and comparative law has grown naturally from my global upbringing.”

LAW FACULTY PORTRAITSColin Miller
Associate Professor of Law
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
JD – William and Mary
BA – University of Virginia

Courses Taught:
Criminal Adjudication
Criminal Law
Evidence

 

Previous Appointment:
Associate Professor of Law, John Marshall Law School

Scholarly Interest:
Evidence law

“I decided to focus on Evidence as my field of study because I am concerned about the fairness of the process that citizens receive in the American justice system.  Whether you are involved in a criminal action or a civil action, a property dispute or a contract dispute, the rules of evidence will play a pivotal role in whether you can prove your case.”

NEW LAW PROFS GROUP AND MUGSAparna Polavarapu
Assistant Professor of Law
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
MALD – Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
JD – Georgetown
BS – MIT

Courses Taught:
International Human Rights Skills Course
Rule of Law Seminar
Transnational Law

Previous Appointment:
Teaching Fellow/Supervising Clinic Attorney,  Georgetown Law Center

Scholarly Interest:
Rights-based approaches to rule-of-law development

“I focus on rights-based approaches to rule of law development because it is unfortunately very easy for less powerful voices to be ignored when laws are being reformed or institutions being built.  Through a rights-based lens I can analyze how legal and institutional reform can be more responsive to the needs of the marginalized.”

LAW FACULTY PORTRAITSNed Snow
Associate Professor of Law
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
JD – Harvard
BA – Brigham Young

Courses Taught:
Copyright Law
Cyberlaw
Intellectual Property
Property

Previous Appointment:
Associate Professor of Law, University of Arkansas

Scholarly Interest:
Constitutional issues in copyright law

“The interplay between the Constitution and copyright law has always fascinated me.  I have appreciated the opportunity to examine the rich history of constitutional copyright law in light of modern practices and norms that are yet emerging through new technologies.”

LAW SCHOOL FACEBOOK 2012-12Candle M. Wester
Assistant Director for Faculty Services
Joined in Fall 2012

Education:
MSLIS – University of Illinois
JD – University of Nebraska
BS – Nebraska Wesleyan

Previous Appointment:
Access Services Librarian & Assistant Professor,Southern Illinois University School of Law

 

Scholarly Interests:
Mentoring, law library management, bioethics

“My areas of scholarly interest include mentoring, law library management, intellectual property, and bioethics. Bioethics in particular fascinates me because there are so many complex layers to it and it is an area where a number of different disciplines are weaved together.”