School of Law offers free CLE credits with Legal IT Seminars

The School of Law Information Technology Department, along with the Technology Law Students Association (TLSA) and the University of South Carolina School of Law’s Student Bar Association (SBA) have joined together to present a regularly scheduled seminar series on Thursday mornings, on how technology affects the law. The series features guest lecturers who are prominent experts in various legal technology fields. The free seminars are held in the Judge Karen J. Williams Courtroom in the School of Law, and are open to both law students and members of the legal community.

October 12

Rethinking Trust and Verification: Uses for Blockchains in the Practice of Law:
Jack Pringle, Partner, Technology Lawyer and Information Privacy Professional at Adams and Reese LLP

All transactions, whether the transfer of funds, the sale of real and personal property, or otherwise, rely on trust and verification. And transactions traditionally require a bank, an escrow agent, or other trusted third party to ensure that trust and verification. But what if a technology system could replace the third-party’s role so that any two people could contract directly with one another? Blockchains (also called distributed ledger systems) may soon offer validation in a number of areas where lawyers practice, including financial transactions, proof and chain of title, and authentication of many types. Understanding the technology, or at least its potential, is important for those attorneys who take part in the process of authentication and verification. Approved for 1 hour CLE credit (177503).

October 26

Breach Response: Be Prepared or Face the Consequences
Karen Painter Randall — Partner, Chair — Cyber Security & Data Privacy Group, Connell Foley LLP

One can hardly turn on the news these days without hearing about the latest victim of a cyber-attack. The legal profession is not immune from the threat of a costly cyber breach. Cybersecurity is one of the biggest risks that law firms face today. Whether or not you are prepared to manage a security breach will determine the final outcome. Thus, this program will focus on the importance of being prepared to respond to a data breach quickly to mitigate legal, ethical, regulatory and reputational loss. Approved for 1 hour Ethics CLE credit (177668)

November 9

Cybersecurity at Warp Speed for the Legal Profession
Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President and John Simek, Vice President, Sensei Enterprises, Inc.

Lawyers have an ethical duty to be competent and to keep their client data confidential. Clients too want to keep their confidential data protected. Our presenters will cover:

  • Cybersecurity standards for small businesses
  • How to prevent data breaches using a combination of technology, policies and training
  • Secure computing when you’re on the road
  • Two factor authentication
  • Intrusion detection systems
  • Encryption
  • The new rules for strong passwords and password management
  • What you must do after a data breach and the components of an Incident Response Plan
  • Defending against — and recovering from — ransomware