He’s protested at Hilton Head Hyundai for 8 months. Meet the man with the sign on U.S. 278

THE ISLAND PACKET, 27 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. LISA EICHHORN:

You’re pushing 60 mph, maybe 70, on the highway, shooting out of the curve near the car dealerships and that big American flag, and you flash by him — the man off to your right wearing golf spikes, holding the sign — and you have no idea you’ve just blown past a battlefield.

A war is being fought here, on a debris-strewn shoulder off U.S. 278. It’s a war of attrition that pits the First Amendment against business interests, one waged between a company that says it’s being slandered and a self-proclaimed patriot with a sales background — the man on the side of the road.

He holds the sign, and the sign holds the clues.

S.C. proposal to overhaul ‘disturbing schools’ charge could become law this year

POST AND COURIER, 19 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. JOSH GUPTA-KAGAN:

South Carolina students could no longer be arrested for “disturbing schools” under Statehouse legislation that advanced Thursday with the backing of law enforcement groups.

The charge’s catch-all definition in state law is so broad “we’re criminalizing youthful behavior,” said Richland County sheriff’s Capt. Chris Cowan.

“If this statute had existed when I was in school, I wouldn’t be wearing this uniform right now,” he said.

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Steller column: Courts give police officers too much leeway to shoot

ARIZONA DAILY STAR, 24 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

You can’t blame police officers for being afraid.

The career they chose naturally puts them in risky situations, and just showing up for work can make them targets. On Thursday, two sheriff’s deputies eating in a Florida restaurant were shot and killed for no apparent reason other than their uniforms.

Yet that fear, that sense of danger may be growing exaggerated among some police officers in some places, at some times, and getting other people killed.

 

The Arizona teacher walkouts are just a skirmish in the larger war on public education

LA TIMES, 26 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. DEREK BLACK:

Teachers are walking out again, this time shutting down campuses in 90 or more school districts across Arizona. Gov. Doug Ducey claims to be puzzled: He endorsed a plan to give teachers raises that would add up to a 20% pay increase over the next three years. Why would teachers walk out now?

Surely part of the reason is that teachers in Arizona know a concession on pay isn’t the same thing as a genuine commitment to public education. State leaders like Ducey are so dead set on privatizing education or spending school funds elsewhere that they are ready to change any rules — even longstanding constitutional and democratic norms — to further that agenda.

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The Fighting Has Begun Over Who Owns Land Drowned by Climate Change

BLOOMBERG BUSINESS, 25 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. JOSH EAGLE:

One April morning in 2016, Daryl Carpenter, a charter boat captain out of Grand Isle, La., took some clients to catch redfish on a marsh pond that didn’t use to exist. Coastal erosion and rising seas are submerging a football field’s worth of Louisiana land every hour, creating and expanding ponds and lakes such as the one onto which Carpenter had piloted his 24-foot vessel.

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States are favoring school choice at a steep cost to public education

CHRON.COM, 24 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. DEREK BLACK:

Teacher strikes are generating a healthy focus on how far public education funding has fallen over the past decade. The full explanation, however, goes beyond basic funding cuts. It involves systematic advantages in terms of funding, students and teachers for charter schools and voucher programs as compared to traditional public schools. Increasing public teacher salaries may end the current protests, but speaking as an expert in education law and policy, I believe it won’t touch the new normal in which public education is no longer many states’ first priority.

My forthcoming research shows that, from funding and management practices to teacher and student policies, states are giving charter schools and private schools a better deal than public schools. These better deals have fueled enormous growth in charter schools and voucher programs that is now nearly impossible to unwind.

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Progressive Democrats run California—yet it does more than many states to shield police from scrutiny

CALMATTERS.COM, 11 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

Cops have a lot of pull in the California Capitol, and over the decades, that’s added up to this startling reality: The Golden State now goes further than many states in terms of protecting police from public scrutiny.

It’s a stark contrast to the state’s “left coast” image. On abortion rights, gun control and climate change, California has embraced some of the most liberal policies in the nation.

But even with a statehouse controlled entirely by Democrats, California laws are friendlier to law enforcement—and less transparent to the public—than those in Wisconsin and Florida, states with Republican governors and legislatures.

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S.C. proposal to overhaul ‘disturbing schools’ charge could become law this year

POST AND COURIER, 19 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. JOSH GUPTA-KAGAN:

South Carolina students could no longer be arrested for “disturbing schools” under Statehouse legislation that advanced Thursday with the backing of law enforcement groups.

The charge’s catch-all definition in state law is so broad “we’re criminalizing youthful behavior,” said Richland County sheriff’s Capt. Chris Cowan.

“If this statute had existed when I was in school, I wouldn’t be wearing this uniform right now,” he said.

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Why There Are So Many Bad Sheriffs

GOVERNING.COM, APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

No matter how tight the food budget, you can always find ways to cut corners. The state of Alabama sends counties a paltry $1.75 per day to feed each inmate locked up in jail, but sheriffs often manage to spend a good deal less than that. They have a strong incentive to do so. The sheriffs get to keep whatever they don’t spend, which in some cases has reached well into the six figures. Daily ration money adds up. 

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