Q & A with Bennett Gore

Clyde “Bennett” Gore, Jr., Clinical Instructor, Veterans Legal Clinic, University of South Carolina School of Law

In December 2016, the Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough Center on Professionalism at South Carolina Law hosted a national symposium on veteran access to justice. Dean Rob Wilcox heard about the dire need of veterans across the country, and he knew there had to be a way that the law school could help out on a local level. Fast forward 18 months and the new veterans legal clinic is set to open its doors, thanks in part to funding from the South Carolina Bar Foundation and the Boeing Company. U.S. Army Veteran and 2005 alumnus Clyde “Bennett” Gore Jr. was hired in February 2018 to lead the new clinic, which begins taking clients on July 2.
Tell us about your military career. When did you join, and why did you feel the call?

I officially joined the Army when I was a sophomore at Wofford College back in 1999, after taking several military science classes my freshman year. However, 9/11 occurred during my senior year, and it only galvanized me in my decision to join the military. I wanted to be able to contribute. Both my grandfathers served during World War II. Additionally, my father and uncle had both served during the Vietnam era.

After graduation, I was commissioned in the U.S. Army as a Second Lieutenant. I was accepted into the Educational Delay program, which allowed me to pursue a law degree and become an officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps.

I entered active duty as a JAG officer in January 2006. I stayed on active duty through August 2014 and was assigned to a wide variety of places including Fort Bliss, Texas; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico; and Fort Polk, Louisiana (my wife’s personal favorite). I also was deployed to Iraq for one year (July 2010 – July 2011).

Are you still active in the military?

I am still in the military and enjoying the opportunity to serve our state. When I left active duty, I joined the South Carolina Army National Guard and was assigned as the Command Judge Advocate for 59th Troop Command. In layman’s terms, I am the lead attorney for 59th Troop Command. Our legal team there consists of two other attorneys and four paralegals. We handle all legal issues for the command in that unit, which includes all criminal law, administrative law, ethics and operational law issues that arise.

Tell us about the new Legal Veterans Clinic.

There is an ever-increasing need for such clinics due to continued ongoing global conflicts where our service members are deployed to. When they return home, they have very unique legal issues related to their service.

Through our efforts we hope to stabilize veterans and the communities they live in by resolving their legal issues, so they can continue to have positive impacts on their communities. Bottom line: These individuals volunteered to serve our nation and through their service, have come home with unique issues. They deserve our assistance with resolving those unique issues.

What types of cases will the clinic handle?

We are going to be taking cases that revolve around issues affecting their ability to obtain and retain employment. We anticipate they will involve housing issues and homelessness; debt and consumer protection issues; and domestic issues that affect both the client and others in the home.

How do veterans start the process of seeing if their legal problem is one that can be solved by the clinic?

They can start by calling 803-777-2278 and speaking with someone from our Veterans Legal Clinic team. We will take some basic information and run them through our screening process, after which we will be able to identify if we can represent them or not.

Can other South Carolina lawyers get involved with the clinic?

Yes! We are going to be hiring private practice attorneys to act as adjunct professors in the clinic. While we’ll start taking clients over the summer, we will begin teaching the clinic in the fall. It will be offered as a 6-hour clinical course in both the fall and spring semesters. Any lawyers who may be interested in helping should be on the lookout for more information.

What has been the most challenging part of setting up the clinic?

I would say the most challenging part of the clinic, and the most fun (in my opinion) has been performing the community outreach and making sure the Veterans know that we are here and that they have the information needed to access our resources. That, truly is what it is about — getting out in the community and engaging with these Veterans on a one-on-one basis.

When you’re not busy getting the clinic set up, how do you like to relax and unwind?

I enjoy spending time with my wife and our daughter. In particular, one our favorite rituals is eating breakfast at Lizard’s Thicket on Saturday mornings. Other than that, I am an avid sports fan, enjoy reading (history and politics), fishing, and being an active member of our church, Trenholm Road United Methodist Church in Columbia, SC.

He’s protested at Hilton Head Hyundai for 8 months. Meet the man with the sign on U.S. 278

THE ISLAND PACKET, 27 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. LISA EICHHORN:

You’re pushing 60 mph, maybe 70, on the highway, shooting out of the curve near the car dealerships and that big American flag, and you flash by him — the man off to your right wearing golf spikes, holding the sign — and you have no idea you’ve just blown past a battlefield.

A war is being fought here, on a debris-strewn shoulder off U.S. 278. It’s a war of attrition that pits the First Amendment against business interests, one waged between a company that says it’s being slandered and a self-proclaimed patriot with a sales background — the man on the side of the road.

He holds the sign, and the sign holds the clues.

S.C. proposal to overhaul ‘disturbing schools’ charge could become law this year

POST AND COURIER, 19 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. JOSH GUPTA-KAGAN:

South Carolina students could no longer be arrested for “disturbing schools” under Statehouse legislation that advanced Thursday with the backing of law enforcement groups.

The charge’s catch-all definition in state law is so broad “we’re criminalizing youthful behavior,” said Richland County sheriff’s Capt. Chris Cowan.

“If this statute had existed when I was in school, I wouldn’t be wearing this uniform right now,” he said.

<Read More>

Steller column: Courts give police officers too much leeway to shoot

ARIZONA DAILY STAR, 24 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

You can’t blame police officers for being afraid.

The career they chose naturally puts them in risky situations, and just showing up for work can make them targets. On Thursday, two sheriff’s deputies eating in a Florida restaurant were shot and killed for no apparent reason other than their uniforms.

Yet that fear, that sense of danger may be growing exaggerated among some police officers in some places, at some times, and getting other people killed.

 

The Arizona teacher walkouts are just a skirmish in the larger war on public education

LA TIMES, 26 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. DEREK BLACK:

Teachers are walking out again, this time shutting down campuses in 90 or more school districts across Arizona. Gov. Doug Ducey claims to be puzzled: He endorsed a plan to give teachers raises that would add up to a 20% pay increase over the next three years. Why would teachers walk out now?

Surely part of the reason is that teachers in Arizona know a concession on pay isn’t the same thing as a genuine commitment to public education. State leaders like Ducey are so dead set on privatizing education or spending school funds elsewhere that they are ready to change any rules — even longstanding constitutional and democratic norms — to further that agenda.

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The Fighting Has Begun Over Who Owns Land Drowned by Climate Change

BLOOMBERG BUSINESS, 25 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. JOSH EAGLE:

One April morning in 2016, Daryl Carpenter, a charter boat captain out of Grand Isle, La., took some clients to catch redfish on a marsh pond that didn’t use to exist. Coastal erosion and rising seas are submerging a football field’s worth of Louisiana land every hour, creating and expanding ponds and lakes such as the one onto which Carpenter had piloted his 24-foot vessel.

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States are favoring school choice at a steep cost to public education

CHRON.COM, 24 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. DEREK BLACK:

Teacher strikes are generating a healthy focus on how far public education funding has fallen over the past decade. The full explanation, however, goes beyond basic funding cuts. It involves systematic advantages in terms of funding, students and teachers for charter schools and voucher programs as compared to traditional public schools. Increasing public teacher salaries may end the current protests, but speaking as an expert in education law and policy, I believe it won’t touch the new normal in which public education is no longer many states’ first priority.

My forthcoming research shows that, from funding and management practices to teacher and student policies, states are giving charter schools and private schools a better deal than public schools. These better deals have fueled enormous growth in charter schools and voucher programs that is now nearly impossible to unwind.

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Progressive Democrats run California—yet it does more than many states to shield police from scrutiny

CALMATTERS.COM, 11 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

Cops have a lot of pull in the California Capitol, and over the decades, that’s added up to this startling reality: The Golden State now goes further than many states in terms of protecting police from public scrutiny.

It’s a stark contrast to the state’s “left coast” image. On abortion rights, gun control and climate change, California has embraced some of the most liberal policies in the nation.

But even with a statehouse controlled entirely by Democrats, California laws are friendlier to law enforcement—and less transparent to the public—than those in Wisconsin and Florida, states with Republican governors and legislatures.

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S.C. proposal to overhaul ‘disturbing schools’ charge could become law this year

POST AND COURIER, 19 APRIL 2018, FEAT. PROF. JOSH GUPTA-KAGAN:

South Carolina students could no longer be arrested for “disturbing schools” under Statehouse legislation that advanced Thursday with the backing of law enforcement groups.

The charge’s catch-all definition in state law is so broad “we’re criminalizing youthful behavior,” said Richland County sheriff’s Capt. Chris Cowan.

“If this statute had existed when I was in school, I wouldn’t be wearing this uniform right now,” he said.

<Read More>