Author Archives: Haley Sprankle

Josh Gupta-Kagan publishes new report

Josh Gupta-Kagan, Assistant Professor of Law, published a new report “Effective Solutions to South Carolina’s Juvenile Justice Crisis: Safety, Rehabilitation, and Fiscal Responsibility,” alongside P&A senior attorney Nancy McCormick and attorneys Robert Meriwether and Jase Glenn of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP. The report addresses how to build a better juvenile justice system that would reduce criminal activity through rehabilitating child offenders in smaller facilities, keeping children and juvenile justice staff safe, and more efficiently spending tax dollars.

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Sheriff’s Department misconduct-claim payouts have soared, topping $50 million last year

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, 9 APRIL 2017, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

In one case, Los Angeles County paid more than $6 million to a woman who had been raped by a sheriff’s deputy during a traffic stop.

In another, it took more than $7 million to resolve multiple lawsuits after deputies in West Hollywood mistakenly shot two hostages, killing one and seriously wounding the other.

Those payouts from 2016 helped drive a dramatic increase in the cost of resolving legal claims against the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department during the last five years, according to records reviewed by The Times.

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If no one is behind the wheel in an autonomous car crash, who pays?

THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, 6 APRIL 2017, FEAT. PROF. BRYANT WALKER SMITH:

In the race to develop autonomous cars, tech companies and car manufacturers might face another hurdle – car insurance.

While many believe driverless cars could reduce the number of accidents on the road, crashes involving self-driving cars still happen, raising questions about liability. Yet, the old convention of auto insurance companies charging the driver at fault to pay for damages will soon no longer work, and car manufacturers are likely to become the culpable party. The shift of burden, experts say, could disincentivize advances of the technology and delay the arrival of an automated future. 

“Everyone wants to have fewer accidents,” James Lynch, chief actuary at the nonprofit organization Insurance Information Institute in New York, tells The Christian Science Monitor. “Public policy would say we want people to buy autonomous vehicles, but simple economics would point to the other direction.”

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Mick Mulvaney’s evolution from ‘Shutdown Caucus’ to Trump’s budget salesman

THE WASHINGTON POST, 1 APRIL 2017, FEAT. PROF. LIBBA PATTERSON:

When the government last shut down, in 2013, Mick Mulvaney considered himself part of “the Shutdown Caucus” — a group of conservative House Republicans who held such a hard line that they were willing to let the lights go out.

Now, four years later, Mulvaney is on a collision course with his former comrades, responsible for convincing intransigent House Republicans to make a different kind of choice and pass a new spending bill by April 28 to avert another shutdown.

The former South Carolina congressman — who was elected in the tea party wave of 2010 and took pride in rejecting his own party’s budget proposals, one after another — now serves as President Trump’s budget director, making him the administration’s chief salesman over the next month on spending matters.

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