Author Archives: Haley Sprankle

President’s proposed budget cuts to education could impact SC schools adversely

SOUTH CAROLINA RADIO NETWORK, 21 MARCH 2017, FEAT. PROF. DEREK BLACK:

President Donald Trump’s budget plan would be felt deeply via program cuts and eliminations proposed for education in South Carolina.

University of South Carolina education law professor Derek Black told South Carolina Radio Network that the President’s budget does cut money for some education-related programs that would benefit students in poorer districts. “21st Century Learning Center Programs support after-school, before-school and summer school programs and would see funding cuts,” Black said. “ Well, we have a lot of low income students here. These programs are crucial to giving those kids a safe place to go before and after school.”

Black said the cuts to general education funding would adversely impact South Carolina because the state is still funding public education below pre-recession levels. “So we’re still in the whole when it comes to school funding and this new budget just makes matters worse.”

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Hiring off-duty police officers a common practice

THE ROANOKE TIMES, 19 MARCH 2017, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

One security service that many police departments offer, but that often goes unnoticed, is off-duty work.

Officers direct traffic near construction sites. They greet people coming in and out of bars. They walk the Berglund Center’s concourse during concerts.

They offer additional security at stores, serving as a deterrent to would-be thieves. Last month, when someone photographed a uniformed Roanoke officer outside Wal-Mart on Dale Avenue Southeast apparently sleeping in his patrol car and posted it on Facebook, people chimed in with a range of responses. Some expressed sympathy that officers work long hours, others questioned whether he was on duty — and, if not, what were the policies on uniforms and vehicles?

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Same-sex legal groundbreaker: Judge says Rock Hill couple married in S.C. for decades

THE HERALD, 19 MARCH 2017, FEAT. PROF. MARCIA ZUG:

Debra Parks wanted to be treated the same as anybody else by the courts. At 62, she’s disabled, and split from her partner of almost four decades. She filed a lawsuit because she wanted her relationship, which ended last year, to be considered a common law marriage under South Carolina law.

Parks is gay. But until 2015, same-sex marriage was illegal.

“I was in a same-sex relationship for all those years,” Parks said. “We owned a house together. We were a family, even when society didn’t accept it.”

Bill Nemitz: Police body cameras are useful tools, but they can distort the truth

PORTLAND PRESS HERALD, 26 FEBRUARY 2017, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

Three cheers for Portland Police Chief Michael Sauschuck.

“I am saddened, I’m disappointed, and I’ll tell you I’m disgusted by any use of a tragedy to further some kind of political agenda around body cameras,” an angry Sauschuck said Tuesday – one day before a protester at City Hall called him “murderer” to his face.

The source of the chief’s frustration: painfully predictable demands for body cameras on Portland police officers – right now – after last weekend’s fatal police shooting of Chance David Baker in the Union Station Plaza parking lot on St. John Street.

According to police and eyewitnesses, Baker, 22, brandished what looked very much like a rifle. It turned out to be a pellet gun.

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