Author Archives: Haley Sprankle

Bockman named interim Public Service Commission commissioner

COLUMBIA REGIONAL BUSINESS REPORT, 7 NOVEMBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. ROBERT BOCKMAN:

Robert Bockman, a former assistant Attorney General, has been appointed an interim commissioner of the South Carolina Public Service Commission by Gov. Henry McMaster. Bockman replaces Nikiya Hall, who resigned from her position as District 6 commissioner on Oct. 31 to take a job with Washington, D.C.-based utility Pepco.

Bockman, 71, served as general counsel of the Public Service Commission from 1977-81, providing advice to the commission and its members and representing the commission and staff in regulatory proceedings and appeals.

“It has never been more important for the Public Service Commission to be made up of public servants that will ask the difficult questions on behalf of South Carolinians, and I am confident that Mr. Bockman will do exactly that,” McMaster said in a news release.

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This SC man won a Supreme Court case. He wants to know why he can’t talk about it

THE STATE, 2 NOVEMBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. JOSH EAGLE:

The University of South Carolina law school is holding a three-day event to mark the 25th anniversary of a S.C. man’s legal victory in the U.S. Supreme Court. But the victor in that case, Davis Lucas, isn’t invited, and he’s upset.

The symposium, continuing through Saturday, focuses on the 25th anniversary of the Lucas v. S.C. Coastal Council case, a dispute over a beachfront housing lot. The Supreme Court’s decision in the case limited the government’s ability to regulate use of privately owned land. A quarter of a century later, attorneys, law professors and state regulators will be discussing the ruling’s impact on coastal development.

Lucas, who sued for the right to build on two lots on the Isle of Palms, is upset neither he nor his attorneys were invited to participate. He said he only found out the forum was being held because a friend’s son attends USC’s law school.

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Apple Co-Founder Blasts Elon Musk For Overhyping Tesla’s Self-Driving Feature

THE DAILY CALLER, 25 OCTOBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. BRYANT WALKER SMITH:

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak believes there is “way too much hype” surrounding Tesla’s ability to deliver mass-produced self-driving electric vehicles.

Tesla’s self-driving capabilities are overblown and lead people to put too much trust in the car’s “autopilot” feature, Wozniak told reporters earlier this month. Many people inside Silicon Valley believe Wozniak was the brains behind Steve Jobs’ Apple computer.

“Tesla has in people’s mind that they have cars that will just drive themselves totally, and it is so far from the truth, so they have deceived us,” he said. Other analysts and academics have made similar complaints about Tesla’s auto feature.

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KCSD bullying case might impact SRO discussion

CHRONICLE-INDEPENDENT (CAMDEN, SC), 31 OCTOBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. JOSH GUPTA-KAGAN:

A civil complaint filed against the Kershaw County School District (KCSD) by the parent of an allegedly bullied student might have an impact on the Kershaw County Board of School Trustees’ discussions about school resource officers (SROs) with Kershaw County Council. The parties in the case are required to enter an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) process by March 16, 2018. Meanwhile, other aspects of the case can move forward.

(In order to protect the identity of the student involved in the case, the C-I is not naming the student, his parent or the school where the alleged bullying took place.)

In the complaint, filed Aug. 18, the parent states that their child attended a particular school during the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years, during which they became the target of bullying and harassment from fellow students. The bullying allegedly took place in person and over social media. As a result, the parent claims their child “ended friendships, quit” a sports team, and “generally retreated from normal school-age activities.”

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New Minneapolis police data dashboard confirms that yes, black people get stopped more

MINNPOST (Minneapolis, MN), 13 OCTOBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

Do Minneapolis police unfairly target people of color, or don’t they?

Your answer to that question these days may say something about your politics, but getting to the actual truth behind it is complicated.

But thanks to newly available data on stops, citations and other actions taken by Minneapolis police, broken down by race, it’s possible to at least put some numbers behind the public debate about race and policing. And those numbers are not available thanks to a data request by a media organization or a lawsuit — they’re part of a new dashboard that is being published by the Minneapolis Police Department itself, in an effort to improve transparency and accountability to the public.

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