Author Archives: Haley Sprankle

When cops commit crimes

VICE, 12 SEPTEMBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

Twelve years ago, a criminal justice master’s student named Philip Stinson got into an argument with his grad school classmates about how often police officers committed crimes. His peers, many of whom were cops themselves, thought police crime was rare, but Stinson, himself a former cop and attorney, thought the problem was bigger than anyone knew. He bet a pint of ale that he could prove it.

 

On Tuesday, Stinson made good on his bet with an extensive police crime database offering the most comprehensive look ever at how often American cops are arrested, as well as some early insights into the consequences they face for breaking the laws they’re supposed to enforce.

The data set includes 8,006 arrest incidents resulting in 13,623 charges involving 6,596 police officers from 2005 through 2012,with more years of data to come. Nearly half these incidents, Stinson and his research team concluded, were violent.

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Feds vow to clear road for self-driving car makers

SF GATE (SAN FRANCISCO), 12 SEPTEMBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. BRYANT WALKER SMITH:

The Trump administration has a message for the scores of companies racing to develop self-driving cars: We want to make your life easier.

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao unveiled revised federal guidelines Tuesday for testing and deploying autonomous cars that she said aim to be nimble and supportive of innovation, while aligning with legislation pending in Congress. While industry praised the guidelines, consumer advocates said they were too lax and could compromise safety.

The voluntary guidelines also encourage states to play a limited regulatory role to avoid a messy patchwork of conflicting rules.

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Not guilty verdict delivered in AL prison abuse case caught on camera

FOX 10 (ALABAMA), 14 SEPTEMBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. SETH STOUGHTON:

ELMORE CO., AL (WSFA) – An Elmore County Jury found Juanice Cole not guilty of assaulting a handcuffed prisoner at Elmore County Correctional Facility in 2015. 

The trial began Wednesday. The defendant took the stand and admitted to striking the prisoner Nedrick Boyd, who is serving a life sentence for attempted murder. Cole told jurors she took physical action against Boyd because he reportedly put his bodily fluids on her during a shift at Elmore County Correctional Facility. 

During closing arguments Thursday, Cole’s defense attorney Kenny James told jurors Cole ‘probably’ reacted poorly to the situation, but justified her use of physical force.

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U.S. updates self-driving car guidelines as more hit the road

LAS VEGAS SUN, 12 SEPTEMBER 2017, FEAT. PROF. BRYANT WALKER-SMITH:

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — The Trump administration on Tuesday unveiled updated safety guidelines for self-driving cars aimed at clearing barriers for automakers and tech companies wanting to get test vehicles on the road.

The new voluntary guidelines announced by U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao update policies issued last fall by the Obama administration, which were also largely voluntary.

Chao emphasized that the guidelines aren’t meant to force automakers to use certain technology or meet stringent requirements. Instead, they’re designed to clarify what vehicle developers and states should consider as more test cars reach public roads.

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